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On 11 February, ADB and the Energy Absolute Public Company Limited signed a $47.62 million green loan that will finance the Nakornsawan Solar and Hanuman Wind power plants and deploy fast and standard chargers at charging stations across Thailand.
The country intends to be the regional forerunner in electric vehicles to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from conventional transportation, which currently accounts for around 26% of the country’s total annual emissions.
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Despite improvements in electricity access in recent years, there are still 155 million people that remain without electricity connection in developing Asia.[1]  This is compounded with the very low rates of access to clean cooking.
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This ADBI Working Paper developed a model to assess the implications of different electricity pricing structures in Indonesia for different aspects of the Energy Trilemma (affordability and access, energy security, and environmental sustainability); and, finds that each pricing system foster specific aspect of the Energy Trilemma. Based on this model, the authors were able to draw a transformation pathway for a more sustainable and just transition to a low-carbon economy in Indonesia.
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Total climate finance in 2020 reached $5.3 billion consisting of ADB resources and co-financing, falling from $7 billion in 2019. The share of climate investments in energy across energy, multisector and other sector’s projects is 44%. A large part of these investments or 96% came from mitigation projects committed in 2020. Adaptation finance in energy accounted for 4%. Apart from having the biggest share in the total climate finance committed in 2020, climate finance in energy also increased from $1.7 billion in 2019 to $2.3 billion in 2020.
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A $37 million financing package from ADB, Canadian Climate Fund for the Private Sector in Asia, and Leading Asia’s Private Infrastructure Fund (LEAP) has assisted Da Nhim–Ham Thuan–Da Mi Hydro Power Joint Stock Company (DHD) to build the first large-scale floating solar PV panels in Viet Nam and the largest installation in Southeast Asia.
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Nearly 40% of households (500,000) in Nusa Tenggara Timur province have no electricity despite Indonesia achieving a national electrification rate of 98%. These include 60,000 households on the remote island of Sumba, which count among the country’s poorest and rely on polluting kerosene and firewood for lighting and cooking.
Off-grid systems have become part of the solution in providing last-mile electricity on the island. However, many households are strapped for cash and cannot afford the service.

  

 

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