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On 4 May, the draft Energy Policy paper was circulated to the members of the ADB Board for their and capitals’ review. The draft Policy paper was also made available online on 7 May as part of the broader consultation process.
 
A series of consultations will follow the disclosure of the draft Policy paper involving stakeholders from developing member countries, multilateral development banks, civil society organizations and other institutions.
 
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This ADBI Working Paper assesses the benefits of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) and asserts its advantages over horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs). It further recommends its adoption in Asia and the Pacific region because it operates with slower wind speeds than the required minimum speed of HAWTs. With very fast winds, VAWTs are cheaper and easier to build, install, operate, repair and maintain than HAWTs. VAWTs do not require a large area of land and can be installed near each other, in between HAWTs and in urban areas.
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On 28 April, the Asian Development Outlook 2021 was released. The report stresses the importance of green and social finance in ensuring inclusive, resilient and sustainable recovery for Asia and the Pacific Region from the coronavirus pandemic.
 
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Rafael, PAEN asserts that power sector reforms are critical not just in removing the fiscal burden that state-owned power utilities have become to government, but also in ensuring the sustainability of these businesses. He offers some recommendations in this blog.
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Summary
Governments across Asia and the Pacific and globally are implementing increasingly ambitious renewable energy targets. Installing wind farms and solar parks is part of the challenge of achieving these goals. Another, more technically complex task is ensuring that electricity supply systems can accommodate a high share of wind and solar energy. Post-COVID-19 fiscal stimulus packages offer a crucial opportunity to invest in renewable energy infrastructure to address these needs.
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This Policy Brief recommends for the tariff differential subsidy in Pakistan to either be eliminated or reduced and its targeting features improved. Pakistan’s energy sector has been beset with power outages, lack of capital investments, and inefficient electricity networks. The reforms proposed seek to arrest this cycle and help bring the sector on the right track.

  

 

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